Every company should have a strong web of work relationships. Long-lasting work relationships strengthen the team and promotes a sense of loyalty that is a huge component to success in the business world. Opening new accounts and encouraging transactions are important, but relationship building should be prioritized just the same. Strong connections that go beyond the mundane emails and telephone calls bring real value and commitment to the work place. Check out some ways you can build long-lasting work relationships.

1.Be Honest

One of the most important rules to any form of communication is being honest. Whether it’s with co-workers or clients, people can always tell an honest, genuine conversation from a fake one. Be authentic in your engagement. Be upfront about your thoughts and feelings even if you know you’ll be in disagreement. Chances are, you’ll earn a lot more respect standing your ground as long as you approach every conversation with an open mind. Those honest moments are what will leave a lasting impression and set the stage for a long-term work relationship. 

2. Value the Connection

two employees drink coffee
Recognize the value of everyone you interact with and make it known how much you appreciate their worth. See co-workers and customers as more than just business tools and allow a relationship to bud naturally. Be sure to take that extra step and ask them about their weekend or update yourself on their family affairs. Find something you can truly connect on and remember it for future conversations. It’ll be your little way of remembering each other. After all, it’s hard to forget the name of someone you just had an exciting 15 minute conversation with about your favorite TV show or hobby.

3. Communicate Frequently

two employees share ideas
Don’t worry about over-communicating. Frequent communication means that you are constantly engaging with those around you, never missing the latest update on a project. The more you interact with business partners or clients, the more everyone is on the same page in terms of productivity. You also start to achieve a level of comfortability that makes it easy to open up a dialogue about what’s working and what is not. You’ll find that the more you are in frequent communication, the better the work flow starts to become. 

4. Refresh Your Relationships

It’s easy to let a long term work relationship grow stale after years of working together. Make sure to reinvigorate your current work relationships every now and again to keep the connection strong. While securing new clients or making sure you develop a personal relationship with the new guy on the team is important, so is making sure the people that have been around for years still feel the same appreciation, accessibility, and attention they felt when they first started working with you. These are the people that have been with you before you were booming with business so remember to reward them by making sure your commitment to them is still at 100%.

5. Cultivate a Partnership

coworkers sharing ideas
Creating strong work relationships requires a mutual commitment from both partners. To make the relationship last long-term, make sure that you both have equal say on the partnership you are envisioning with each other. Take the time out to have a conversation about what each of you is expecting from the relationship work wise, and hone in your common goal. Remember that cultivating a work partnership takes just as much time and dedication as any other relationship in your life. So treat those with the same respect.

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About the Author

Kathleen Cancio Headshot

Kathleen Cancio is a freelance blogger who has worked in PPC Marketing and Public Policy Research. She was most recently a Search Marketing Analyst at CommonMind, LLC, one of Clutch’s top PPC Agencies for 2015. She has a wide range of interests including painting, traveling and hiking.