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Webinar: Remote =/= Disconnected

Join Mike Smalls, CEO, Hoopla, Scott Leese, Founder, CEO, Scottleeseconsulting & Surfandsales.com, and Becc Holland, Head of Sales Development, Chorus.ai for an after-hours talk about making sure your sales team stays motivated and engaged while working remotely. We discussed tips on helping your team overcome distractions, stay focused with competition and becoming even more productive while working from home.

Transcript: 

Mike Smalls: 

Hi everyone welcome to our webinar titled “Remote does not equal disconnected my name is Mike Smalls.  I'm the CEO of Hoopla Software the employee engagement and motivation platform and joining me today is two experts in the field. We're gonna let them be the the ones who drive most of the content here. Becc Holland who's the head of sales development at Chorus welcome, Becc,  I know you have a lot more things in your background as well to share.  And Scott Leese, founder of Surf and Sales which is a kind of the uncommon sales conference in exotic locations and former head of sales at several SaaS companies and now runs his own consulting company so welcome you guys thanks for joining us today. 

Scott Leese: 

Yeah good to see you guys. 

Becc Holland: 

Thanks for having me. 

Mike Smalls

So it's safe to say that pretty much everyone's been impacted by the covid crisis and the vast majority, if not all of the teams are working from home now, many for the first time.  So there's a lot of topics around this. We've seen webinar after webinar and podcast around remoteness and managing remote teams but today we're just gonna focus on one aspect of that which is how do you keep teams motivated and engaged and productivity high while everyone's suddenly working from home. So a lot of the folks who are tuning in are looking for tips and tricks on how do you keep that happening right now because of the Covid crisis. but you know this is something experts are predicting that might become the new normal.

I've heard things that we might have accelerated the work from home movement by three to five years and that 30 percent of the people will never go back to the office full-time anyway and so this may be more relevant even further from from this point so before we kind of get started, Becc,  can you tell us a little bit about how your organization set up relative to the office, remoteness, et cetera? 

Becc Holland 

Yeah so I I can give you a little rundown it chorus but before I jump into that I I think it's interesting because I've always been managed remotely since I've been in SAS oddly enough I was thinking back to it today and you know I've worked for four different companies since I've been in the tech space and moved out to Silicon Valley.  The first one I was managed by someone sitting in Berlin and I was managing a team in multiple places. The second company I was managed by someone sitting in Tel Aviv third company I was managed by someone sitting in Chicago and then now you know I was commuting back and forth to Boston for eight months and now the  team that I manage sits in Boston what while I'm in San Francisco.  So you know chorus as a whole we are set up very very remote friendly so almost all of our Account Executives are remote they're in Dallas, they're in Salt Lake City, either in Washington, you know and one of our managers is even in Florida.  So we're a very very remotely based company but I agree with you, I think a lot of companies you know they felt a couple of the pains of figuring out what it looks like to be removed by necessity not by choice you know within the last few weeks here.

Mike Smalls

Yeah exactly and Scott you led sales at a bunch of different companies what was typically the makeup for you?

Scott Leese

Well I've had as many as 200 reps under one roof in one city before in the Bay Area and I've been a Sales Leader at multiple companies that had offices scattered across the country. So similar to Becc I've been used to being managed remotely and used to managing other people remotely for a long time got as many as four offices in four different time zones under one roof Before and one of the the clients that I have right now I've been serving in an interim CRO role for a while and this is their first time working remotely as a sales team, but I I have a rep in Boston, I have a couple in Austin and I have a couple in San Francisco so that's kind of a the current structure but I've been doing a lot of this remote kind of management for portal for a while even if the even if it wasn't every one sitting actually at home right so maybe the distinction is home versus kind of Remote.

Mike Smalls 

Yeah the old days was the field rep right I mean yeah now it's more a lot more home-based well.  As we kind of before we dive into the remoteness challenges around sort of motivating and engaging these teams but it's almost we should should start with the unique aspects of salespeople in general right there's a there's a true motivational profile of salespeople right. You know people tend to self-select into jobs that fit their their psychology and there may be their myers-briggs or whatever. But Harvard Business Review did a study years ago where they analyzed the archetype of salespeople and they said you know the label they gave them was happy losers because they face a ton of rejection. You know it was like you make 100 calls in a day you might get through to three people or your pipeline you only close the third of the deals or whatever so what  they were saying is that because salespeople they're kind of drawn to that because of the challenge because a win is so much more important when you know that it's so hard to get you know and things like challenge winning recognition they want the visibility etc but I'm curious what you guys have seen as you've managed teams over the years what you know does that sense that you ring true to you or do you feel like you know there's other aspects that you know that matter here in the psychology.

Scott Leese

The psychology rings true for sure there's  of course a lot of other layers that go into that even that term which I laughed at you know "happy losers" there's something there's something in there that is disrespectful to salespeople in my opinion huh and part of the step is of sales people's like: oh I'm a I'm a happy loser? oh I'm a degenerate? okay yeah right. You want me to have more more motivation like now my motivation is to prove you wrong and to kick your butt.

Right and sure yes I can do something so yeah I mean we we tend to be as a group of workers like very motivated very competitive kind of people outspoken self confident and you know just competitive. Yeah I want to compete against you and beat you and gonna bring the way you're teaming if you're my competitor I really want to pound you know and leave you in the dust. So yeah there's so many other layers that go into it but but yeah some of that Springs very true to me. 

Mike Smalls:

How about you Becc? what do you think?

Becc Holland: 

Yeah so when it comes to being motivated you know I think that a lot when it comes to I know you mentioned hiring what the profile of people are looking for typically in salespeople I mean at the end of the day they're looking for someone who can crush their goal you know and add to their culture and be you really a proponent for their team and so they diagnose that down to:  Does the person have Drive? is the person coachable? and does the person have like high acumen? at least those are the three most common traits that I've seen. But the fourth trait for me and this might just be my team  full disclosure but the reps that I have worked with that are the most successful are the ones that have the highest accountability and the highest self esteem.

So I took as part of, Sandler selling methodology, it's one of the most popular methodologies out there in the beginning of the methodology before you learn any kind of training basically Sandler has you diagnose your own self esteem and say like on a scale of one to ten how good are you at being you and gets the person to self identify you know and kind of remove the this way of their performance against who they are, but I mean when it comes down to it,  I've noticed the really good reps it's like you don't have to tell them to want the ball. You don't have to tell them to want a deal to close you don't have to tell them to you know really push for something to happen you might have to train on technique you might have to train on product knowledge but when it comes down to being highly accountable for your success and highly accountable for your failure.  You know without fault I have seen across the board that those top performers are always holding themselves to a higher bar and they're always really competitive about that bar like Scott mentioned. 

Mike Smalls: 

Great yeah, that rings true so as a leader then you know what role do you play in terms of either creating the right environment for engagement motivation or whether there are some of the techniques you guys have used to sort of like get the energy level high get people really performing at their top level you want to go first Becc? 

Becc Holland:

Yeah I can lead here um I might just be the team's that I've worked with but sales people and I'll speak for myself we like recognition you know whenever we win or whenever we almost even lose for motivational purposes we want to know we want that to be recognized. So you know talk to the Sales Leader board they want that to be pushed in front of you know whether that's the company or the team or the adjoining department so like a couple of technique items.  I always think back to what my mom said growing up she said hey you need the promise of the kingdom and the threat of the fiery gates of Hell behind you to get someone motivated and I think it's really really important like even though salespeople are intrinsically motivated you know they're really accountable for their results I think it's always good to kind of put some some buffers to keep them on path and keep them accountable so that you do them the most favors. So a couple of examples um you know we have a channel like a slack channel internally and every single time someone books an outbound meeting on the PDR team you know or CEO all of our executive leadership is in there and it lights up you know and so it really gives recognition to the person if like this thing just happened and so it's really important to BDRs to get recognition you know and to see that their results are being seen by the rest of the company so that's that's one thing that I've deployed to you know almost motivate and inspire by positive recognition for something for an outcome that we want. 

Scott Leese: 

Certainly do the same kind of things. I mean there's there's nothing like closing a deal are setting a demo and having you know hundreds of emojis show up on your on your slack channel because we did something good and people from all across the company are  fired up about it. You know I got in sales because I wanted to either feel like I won or lost every single day and and so that that like reward for what you've done right and the shame, not even punishment, just the shame of like being at the bottom of the leaderboard that is so so motivating so you know putting things inplay is like contests and games whether they're short term sales contests and spiffs for like the day or the week or longer ones like quarterly goals and President's Club and things like that and making some of the the rewards you know really what what somebody wants. I'm not talking about like a $50 gift card right that's not good not gonna move the needle very much I've sent reps all across the world and you know believe me as soon as I have a chance to put a contest in place where people can travel again I'm gonna be all about it.  But you know I've had contests where people have gone to Paris and Spain and Dominican Republic and places like that you know in you you work in sales you work really hard it's super stressful and you really want to go unplug sometime and so put some things you know put some carrots out there and some goals for everybody to kind of chase down and have a big big reward not a tiny little you know me kinda motivating thing like make it big. make it special.

Mike Smalls:

Right well I noticed neither of you guys talked about the the classic one which is all reps are just coin-operated everything you guys talked about was outside of money which I think someone who's not in sales would would be surprised at listening to this webinar. 

Scott Leese:

Well I think I think that that notion or belief is is has been dying for a while and might not be all the way dead but I think it's it's dying off my experience is that people value experiences more and experiences and things more than the money you know if I was to run a contest and Becc was the winner and I gave her a thousand bucks she might be excited have a thousand bucks but what's she gonna spend that thousand dollars off rent food bills right if I take that thousand dollars and sent it to you know Belize for three or four days for a long weekend on the beach she's liable to remember that forever and say my company sent me to Belize one time so I think that the coin-operated part and just show me the money I think that that is as important to kind of the modern seller as it as it used to be I don't know if Becc agrees or not that that's my  thoughts.

Becc Holland: 

I agree with you I think that salespeople are really competitive and the one thing that they had that coin operation has going against it is you can't show someone your bank statement especially not internally like it's just on appropriate to be like hey I clocked whatever 280k and you clock 260 K it's just not appropriate. So you know I think kind of resorting back to the like competitive piece it's like you know Scott mentioned we're all about experience and especially Millennials they're driven by learning by doing and so one of the things that I notice when I come in as a leader you know the first thing that I do is I'm trying to get they get everyone producing so I can earn the right to affect more strategic initiatives within our company earn the right to ask those tough questions earn the right to have a seat at the table and so you know when I take a step back and I look at myself and I look at my peers a lot of times you know the competitive pieces like okay how quickly can I be a leader? or how quickly can i you know transition from sales said to sales? or how quickly can I go from you know you know a BDR to an AE? and so I think you know realizing that for most people.

I have never talked to someone - true story - I've never talked to someone who said I'm leaving an organization because of the amount that I was getting paid was unfair. I've never heard someone cite that as the cause and so I think knowing that your salespeople are competitive knowing that like it's almost a top of the leaderboard that being recognized and that being almost enough of like I I don't necessarily love it that I'm going to President's Club I love it that I'm going to President's Club first and then I'm the one you know while everyone else is sitting at home because it shows that I was able to pull something off.

So it kind of roots back to one of the things that I love about sales the most and this is just Scotts point earlier, it's like you know it is objective and it is impact driven, so it's not all your thoughts and theories and ideas and like oh well I think it's like okay you know your quotas whatever but you know million-and-a-half net new ARR okay for the year how well did you do against that quota and so for all the people out there who would rather watch track over figure skating or something that's something more subjective, or an art I think that's you know that it tracks and pulls in that kind of profile of someone who wants to say like hey for better for worse whether I didn't hit it or not or I'm you know low on the leaderboard or high on the leaderboard I want this thing to be objective of like did I win lose or did I hit mediocrity based on this objective standard?

Mike Smalls: 

So if we shift this concept now to everybody's working from home now maybe a company who hasn't done that in the past they relied on maybe the environment the work environment the culture the the peer pressure within the the sales floor and now they're working from home. So what are some of the challenges to doing what we're talking about motivating our teams engaging them keeping all that stuff front and center now that they're working from home. What do you guys see is the key challenge there? 

Scott Leese: 

I actually think the first challenge comes from the leadership itself and that and that challenge is knowing that you just need to trust your people.  I actually think that people are more motivated right now than they maybe they've ever been there is nothing else for them to do. I think people are well aware that there's a lot of organizations and industries who are downsizing like mad and people are motivated a little bit out of their own kind of fear nobody wants to end up unemployed right now right? So, I don't need to be leading from a place of fear and talking to people about like you better work because if you don't  people already know that. So you know sales has gotten, we're the last ones who have not had the ability to work remote generally speaking you know as a whole industry because we haven't been trusted, you can't trust limit dials you can't trust them to you know send the right number of emails, and hell sometimes some organizations are like “I can't trust you remote because I don't even know what you're gonna say on the phone.” So the first thing that we have to do is the leadership has to operate from a position of trust and trust that my team underneath me knows what they need to do they're motivated to do it and my job then becomes simply to get obstacles out of their way.

I have to do everything I can to remove things that might be impeding their ability to close deals and so I just am constantly trying to check in with everybody and I don't mean a zoom call because the worst thing you could do right now is just have a death by meeting situation you know I don't need to have a 30-minute one-on-one with every single one of my reps today via zoom. Sorry, if people are doing that I don't agree with that all.  I need to do is just shoot him a quick note be like hey how's it going what's a blocker in your way today right how can I work to get it done right is that a contract thing is it something you know I had a rep the other day who was asking about his paycheck his payroll. I'm like “don't worry about that I'm gonna go deal with that” right so I think just operate from a place of trust and just work to remove blockers and obstacles from your your team's way that's the first thing that I would do from a leadership perspective. 

Mike Smalls: 

Becc do you have anything to add? 

Becc Holland: 

Yeah, I think he's right on I mean something that I've seen it's like look the two things that I think are played out to death if you will in this like in this new ecosystem is number one everyone's saying like hey well you know the Silver Bullet is lead with empathy. It's like okay got it like I'll say like hey I hope you're well and it's like but then what you know that's table stakes in my opinion but it's like empathy and then I when I go to LinkedIn and I scroll through and I see like all these different posts it's always an organization's with everyone's little zoom box and they're all in like a flannel or a hat or you know they have some kind of theme. It's like everyone had hat day or you know let's see York red day or you know pets day and let's all take a screen shot and make it feel like you know we're all one team and it's like hey you know I am very less is more when it comes to internal meetings I don't think that people love them um you know they're always sitting in there thinking like what's my part in this meeting and how am I gonna be better or impacted just table stakes impacted by this meeting and so you know when I take a step back and I think like what is the real thing that we're missing from being in person with one another it's not that we're sitting around I hope and talking about you know how was your weekend and you know how is your family in XY and Z.

It's more so like - how do we make sure that we still have a infrastructure and a culture of cross collaboration? how do I make sure that my BTR's and AES are sharing information to one another?  how do I make sure that you make it almost as easy as if someone was sitting across the table from you you know in terms of feedback or in terms of like hey we have a bunch of different initiatives that we're gonna roll out and it really takes a team? so you know what I'm thinking about the the pains of rolling into the new ecosystem it's how do I keep that collaboration up on work related topics? not how do I see your apartments more? but on the on the grander scheme it's like you know like Scott said I think you know most organizations they aren't dirty tech techies like us they don't know go to in WebEx and you know whatever zoom is table stakes they don't know all these sales engagement platform is table stakes they like you know we are in a very rare I think unique cross-section and so I think it's more so how can we help enable teams either from a product perspective or you know from a Content perspective? of like hey I know that you've been a rep at Oracle and you've been selling in the field for 25 years and you're an enterprise rep and you probably wrote the book on all the selling methodology - how do I help enable you of this is not a door knocking situation where you go buy drinks and you know Chum me up on the golf course how do you turn this into a rapport building game virtually?

I think is the biggest gap that we need to help you know maybe it's larger organizations or more field sales organizations but how do we help those organizations really understand how to have a remote culture because we've been doing this for quite a while.

Mike Smalls: 

Yeah it's a good point I mean I think part of this you know I was talking to a neighbor of mine who works for a software company and she was told: don't sell right now. It's you know it's not cool to sell and that's her job right she's she makes commission for a living and they're telling her don't sell exactly so you talk about you know part of this the the converse of all this is the demotivators: on how do you actually deflate a team while they were working from home? They're already afraid, there's things that are on their mind I'm am I gonna have a job? am I gonna be able to make my commission? check and so I think what you're pointing out is a very good point it's like how do we now more than ever give our teams the the content or they prep the process in the approach so they canwin today right I think you were telling me some things back about the things you've been telling your teams?  About the objection handling and all that ?

Becc Holland: 

So yeah I mean a lot of teams I feel like are saying like oh well how do I keep my team motivated? I'm like you keep their numbers up. That's how you keep them motivated you give them some kind of messaging system that helps earn their commission and feel like they're not gonna be charged because like just Scotts point they're all wondering whether they're gonna be turned so it's like you know I think that's the rare case and they're telling someone like don't sell like you mentioned with your new it's like don't sell and you're gonna stay onboard into half full quota attainment it's like most of us we may have a little reduced quota or we have a full bag. and it's like so the things that I've been telling my teams do it's like from the tactical perspective I'm like the answer is intense well the answer is we need to it's like I don't know it's like we got a goal of four how do we add in a certain way to get there.

So the couple of things that I've deployed and I'm not going to say that I have all the answers but the things that I've deployed over here is basically three prongs I said you know number one: Their objections are realer than ever, so typically I trained on like hey a ninety five five objection handling rule of like ninety five percent of the time when they're saying send me an email or no time or not interested or I'm not the right person or I'm running into a meeting or I'm in a meeting and I took this call because I thought you were someone in the hospital like I'm like most the time I would coach my reps like hey that is a you know when someone walks up to you with a clipboard and says will you sign you're saying any kind of objection any level of objection like no time I'm pretending like I'm on the phone I'm walking around him and I have no idea what they do so I would Train  my team like hey you know you need to pattern interrupt and and get around that objection because it's not real, but in the current you know economic state I'm like now more than ever because of budget cuts or because of layoffs or because of you know reorgs internally II like those objections are going to be realer than ever.

Scott Leese: 

Yeah I think you should be working on skills right now has anybody been taught something some skill any any skill and anything and and and learned something new and gotten better at whatever the task is and walked away less motivated. So you want to keep your team engaged and keep them motivated help them freaking sell better.  Yeah I spent an hour on the on a call with a client of mine a one-on-one client of mine and we dissected two of his calls just like two 25-minute calls that he had just broke down every little thing and then you know he gave me feedback later on in the week and was like man that session was like legendary right reps are dying salespeople are dying for this type of coaching and help and and sales leaders you know we presumably are in this profession in line of work because we like teaching people we like helping people we like other people closing deals more than we like closing deals Ourselves right?

And so now we have that we have that opportunity if people are not exactly sure what to do with their day they're maybe they're being told you know don't sell or don't sell as much whatever this is the perfect time to work on your your skill gaps right - and working on your skill gaps and coaching people is going to increase the motivation and the the collaboration to Becc’s point and you know people will just feel good about where they're at and who they're working for. I'm just saying no one has ever learned something new and come away less motivated from from the experience. 

Mike Smalls: 

That's good it's good advice so for for folks who are you know tuning in maybe like you're saying Beck I think the not everybody the has the exact same sort of tool comfort that we have in terms of just all these different techniques that we've used for years in Silicon Valley companies what advice would you guys give to somebody who's like this is the first time I've ever managed a remote team and I'm motivating like any specifics like here's how you should you know a set up meetings with the team? Anything that comes to mind there?

Becc Holland: 

Yeah I mean I think from a leadership perspective to me you always need to iron out for your team what's the best in practice so I'd be very very clear on your expectation of okay you know let's say an activity metric now you're dialing or now you're having zoom meetings remotely and it might be a good time to say like hey these the six pieces of a cult or these are the six pieces of a discovery call you know and I want to hold you accountable that all these are being achieved and  basically I would be rethinking as a leader like how do i iron everything out for my team so that they can deploy it in terms of infrastructure whether that's on discovery call whether that's on cold call you know whether that's on activity metric like iron out for them that it's almost like dummy proof what they should be doing and then you know make sure that they're adhering to it in some regard.

No I'm not saying like give people a script but give people an infrastructure of like hey these are the three things you need to achieve in this front portion and like are they achieving those things and learning how to you know I work for a coaching platform and it's always stunning to me of you know people want to value coaching they want to coach the reps a lot more but they just don't know what to coach on they're like well what is the best kind of cold call that makes the best conversion and what is what are the you know things that I need to cover in a discovery call that will actually get the deal won so I would for my org, you know either be very very interested in like a third-party trainer in terms of infrastructure or develop my own and say like hey these are the things that I think will lead up to success, and we can pivot and beta tests and etc. But I want to outline I want for a coaching session to be more skill based and more technique based and I want them to walk away thinking “oh I learned how to do something I didn't know how to do before” as opposed to most coaching  one-on-ones I hear about is like hey you know if they happen.

It's like okay well your pipeline goals this what are you gonna do to get there? you know here's where you are? and it's almost like this verbatim check-in but I would just be you know from a leadership perspective find out what you think that is going to lead to conversion and then coach reps to where they leave every single session with you -if you're going to take their time and your time to have a session- that they leave thinking okay I learned one two and three and these are the things to work on to make my cold calls or my discovery calls better.

Scott Leese: 

Yeah I'll piggyback on the time issue and change my point I think you need to become absolutely ruthless and efficient with your time. We've all been in God knows how many meetings that go on and on and on or there's just mindless nonsensical conversations happening and there's a little bit of tolerance for that when you're in the office perhaps when you're at home nobody wants to hear any of that get me off of the zoom make this relevant get in get out what does it be brief and be brilliant be gone right so I think that is something that you know if you're leading a remote team for the first time be really really efficient with your time people get on the meeting get to the point go through your agenda and get off and let people get about  their day. Another point on efficiency with time you as a leader have got to be unbelievably responsive right now because I can't walk over to Becc and say hey I've got this you know question this got on hold over here right so I have to Hawkeye all of my devices and all of my modes of communication so I've got like three emails open my LinkedIn inbox my slack channel my my cellphone is ready to receive text messages on my computer right like I have to get back to people as fast as humanly possible it's unacceptable to me as a Sales Leader right now if it's taking you 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 minutes to get back to something you've got to be able to be holding a conversation with somebody right we're writing an email to somebody and a notification pops up and it's perfect you've got to be able to deal with it right away so really really being efficient with your time.

Then you know what you're gonna learn if you're going remote for the first time and this is gonna be a hard truth but you're gonna learn all the ways your current process sucks and is broken it's going to expose you it's going to expose you it's going to expose mediocrity in your process mediocrity on your team and that's gonna be a hard thing for people to take a look at. But once done kind of accepting that you know there's some weakness here and the areas for improvement what I'd be doing is trying to fix all those all those gaps right now right it could be something really small like wow I never realized it took us like eighteen steps to actually send out a contract and get it back how can we shrink this down? could be something like that or it could be you know wow I'm realizing that when product releases new features we in the sales department are totally clueless and out of the loop I'm recognizing now how many times we had to go ask if this certain thing was done yet right or oh wow I didn't know that was released so all of these process gaps that were there that maybe were hidden or kind of duct taped over when you're in person those are all gone they're going to they're going to expose with some busted things so I've been looking at weaknesses in my process and just constantly trying to tinker fix and close those those gaps up.

Mike Smalls: 

Yeah it sounds like you know if done will well you can actually come out of this stronger than before right and could actually excel because of this environment.

Scott Leese

Right yeah you know find a way to thrive in the environment it's not just like you know they'll be people who are in survival mode but you want to move from survive to thrive that's got to be your your goal. 

Becc Holland: 

Yeah I almost of you I know if Scott I know you played soccer but it's almost like this pandemic has always been like playing a game against a competitor in the rain it's like it it's an equalizer so it doesn't really what companies have done to date sadly it's about how fast can they adapt how agile can they be and how how can they what do they do from this point moving forward so it's like companies you know who have a jump on remote in a history of remote they have an advantage but one thing that I have not seen in the market too much it's like, it's tricky, people are really sensitive during this time in rightfully so you know they're really on edge. And so it's like if you mention Covid and say like hey this is why I'm reaching out to you then people say you're monetizing and pandemic if you don't mention Covid then people say you're insensitive you have no idea what you're talking about because you came into my world and so it's like what I've done to kind of lie in the middle is like I'm  rethinking through who is my buyer now? So let's take off all event companies or companies that are doing layoffs or companies that are just trying to put out fires right now it's like now it's not the time to sell them software who is might am now given the current you know state of the economy and pandemic.

Then it's like how can I reposition my value prop from the core up so it's like chorus in February we were talking all about how we can make your sellers better.  Chorus in April we're talking about how we enable remote teams through cross collaboration and through reps accountable to multi-threading and to you know this is how you coach remotely and this is how you can you know enable enable reps to crush their numbers during the pandemic so it's like I would always implore companies to think through what your buyers thinking and say like how and I reposition like you know Hoopla and the past might have been gamification and how do I motivate reps? and now it should be you know respectfully all about how do I motivate them remotely? Like being through your different value props and how do I sell you have a new buyer you have a new buyer in April than you ever did before so I think that companies who are repurposing content and who are saying like oh I'm just gonna adapt this with a little slight, they're missing a huge opportunity to start over and say like okay let's be creative let's be innovative let's think outside of the box and let's rethink our value prop in a way you know what is our software doing the new remote selling environment because the people I think I read a quote once that said um the buyer or the seller who's gonna sell the most is the one who can summarize their prospects pain better than the prospect to summarize it themselves. So it's like how can your value prop to be entirely you know as much as it can be selling remotely during the current environment without mentioning Covid so you don't come off like that you're monetizing what's going on. 

Mike Smalls: 

Yeah really good points. We've got a question from the audience what are the early warning signs that you pick up on from your employees while working remote before performance suffers?  Like what, as a leader, what are the signs that you can see?

Scott Leese: 

I'm gonna interpret the question as like signs that somebody is kind of disengaging or throttling down type of thing I mean certainly the the numbers right you know the important numbers not just deals with meeting set demos held and these kind of things and then I kind of reverse engineering like all the way back up to while they're dials are actually down you know as well.  I think more than that you look for some disillusionment or confusion or for signs of like helplessness or shocking responsibility right there's a lot of like Oh nobody wants to spend the money anymore right now. really? okay I mean all due respect, like I closed one hundred and seventy four thousand dollar deal on Monday people are still spending money all right but so you see you see them start to just shift the responsibility a little bit and to sort of give off this vibe of like well what are we supposed to do right now?

It's not my fault nobody's doing this all my prospects tell me this and and there's like a little bit of quit that's like I'm just a little bit of quit right that's a little bit of give up a little bit less fight and so I would be paying really close attention to those kind of kind of cues and signals that that might come across in their responses and their tone and their interactions with you and I would really try to get on that quickly I would not let that you know infiltrate the rest of the team I would not let that kind of linger and chalk it up to like well you know maybe they're having a bad day. I would go at that really hard and be like hold on, right and I'd bite that. 

Mike Smalls:

Great answer well good I think that's all the questions we have for right now. I think one of these what's been great about this conversation is you guys really honing in on what really matters to motivating these teams it's about the quality of the interactions and getting these team our teams to actually be better during this time so they come out of this I'm much more high-powered team when we're finally out of this hopefully as soon as possible but the that's great you guys this is very helpful I'm sure a lot of value that people can get out of this. So thanks for your time Scott, for your time Becc, and we appreciate it thank you.